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Bike Seats

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Bike Seats for Sale

Choosing a bike seat, also known as a saddle, is one of the most personally subjective choices you can make with your bike. Whilst it may seem daunting given the sheer volume of options available, it’s worth putting in a little bit of effort to find one right for you. Researching which options may suit you best can save you (and your rear) pain, as well as time and money.

Saddle Fitment

Whether you’re replacing a worn-out saddle or upgrading due to discomfort, being fitted for a saddle will take a lot of the guesswork out of the buying process. Similar to being fitted for a pair of running shoes, riders will have their own individual riding style as well as preferences when it comes to cushioning, saddle shape and width. Most local bike shops will typically offer a saddle fitting service or at the least have test saddles available for you to try before you buy.

Discipline specific

Many saddles are pitched as being discipline specific. In reality, assuming it’s comfortable for you, nearly all saddles will work on all types of bikes. However, some subtle differences do differentiate them.

Saddles designed for recreational cycling are typically generously covered in soft padding, often with pressure relieving channels and gel. Whereas by comparison, saddles designed for road bikes are typically quite minimal, designed to be more supportive and hold the rider in a more stable and symmetrical position with less chance of chafing.

Mountain bike saddles are much like those found on road bikes, but typically feature smoother edges for less chance of snagging your shorts in technical terrain. Additionally, mountain bike saddles will offer scuff guards on the edges of the saddle to help ward off crash damage.

Budget

The price of a saddle can be a good indicator as to the quality of its construction and materials used, with more expensive saddles often swapping plastic bodies and steel rails for lighter weight materials such as titanium and carbon fiber. One thing to note is that more expensive saddles can have more of an emphasis on being lightweight and minimal in padding and support. For those on a budget, browsing private ads is often a great way to grab a bargain, as saddles often pop-up in as new condition.